Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Jennifer Gauthier wins Larew Award for teaching

Jennifer Gauthier, associate professor of communication studies, was named as the recipient of the Gillie A. Larew Distinguished Teaching Award during Convocation ceremonies August 31, 2010 at Randolph College.

The award is given annually to a faculty member for outstanding teaching.

"Gauthier is known for being both challenging and caring." said Dennis Stevens, dean of the college, in announcing the award. "One of her students said that she 'is a gifted thinker and educator and an asset to this academic community.' Another said that 'it seems as if she never has an ‘off’ day."

"She is liked and respected by her colleagues. My predecessor referred to her as 'a walking power plant' because of the energy and enthusiasm she brings to her students. She takes her teaching seriously, both in and out of the classroom, as is shown by her work in leading the Driver Film Festival, which focused on social issues of intense concern to students."

The Gillie A. Larew Distinguished Teaching Award was established to honor Gillie Larew for her amazing contribution to the college. She was a student at Randolph-Macon Woman's College in 1900 and returned to teach mathematics for 46 years. She also served as Dean of the College for four years. It is the oldest of our faculty awards, having been first presented in 1968. The recipient is chosen by a committee of former winners in consultation with the Dean of the College.

Randall Speer wins Davidson Award

Randall Speer, associate professor of music, was named as the recipient of the Katherine Graves Davidson Award during Convocation ceremonies August 31, 2010 at Randolph College.

The award is given annually to a faculty member who has brought distinction to the College.

"This year's winner has had a significant impact on our community," said Dennis Stevens, dean of the college, in announcing the award. "Not only is he a respected teacher, but he has enriched our lives by his contributions to the cultural life of the college and the greater Lynchburg community."

In the past year, Speer has published two original choral works, organized and directed the collaborative production of Mozart's Requiem, and led a student Summer Research team in a project to catalog the College's music archives. Speer serves as director of the Randolph College Chorale and the Touch of Harmony vocal jazz ensemble. He has composed original works for Randolph College theatre productions and served as a judge for community music competitions.

Speer has taken the power of music to Westminster Canterbury, and he has brought the power of music to Randolph College students in his international study seminar in Austria, Italy, and Bulgaria.

"A colleague says that he is affable, quick to laugh, optimistic, cheerful, never complains, and works incredibly hard," said Stevens.

The Katherine Graves Davidson Award was established in 1975 to honor Trustee Emerita Katherine Graves Davidson, '35. The award has been made possible by gifts from Mr. and Mrs. J. Wilson Newman in recognition of the services rendered to private education by Mrs. Davidson and her husband, Frank G. Davidson. It is given annually to a faculty member who has brought distinction to the college. The recipient is chosen by a committee of local alumni, in consultation with the Dean of the College.

Emily Chua wins Davidson Scholarship Award

Emily Chua, associate professor of music, was named as the first recipient of the Katherine Graves Davidson Scholarship Award, during opening convocation ceremonies at Randolph College on August 31, 2010.

The award, named in honor of former Trustee Katherine Graves Davidson and made possible by gifts from Mr. and Mrs. J. Wilson Newman, is designed to call attention to the importance of faculty scholarship, including creative activity.

Chua has been described by her colleagues as "thoughtful, energetic, and an outstanding pianist who gives selflessly of herself." In addition to her many recitals both on and off campus, Chua has gained a reputation for her musical scholarship.

In collaboration with Nicholas Ross she released a CD entitled "A Piano Odyssey: Kent Holliday."

"If you haven't had the opportunity to listen to it, I recommend that you do," said Dennis Stevens, dean of the college, in announcing the award. "I was particularly touched by her interpretation of the Sonata for Piano, which includes Holliday's musical response to the events of September 11, 2001. I was deeply touched by it, and I am sure that it will also speak to you."